2/14/2016
Question from Scott Bierman
 
Hello
Looking at picking up a pair of Syborgs but none of our local retailers carry them. The Scarpa Alien in a 26.0 fits me perfectly, does anyone know how the fit between these two compares?

thanks

sb
2/14/2016
Answer from jbo
 
Hi Scott, you would be a 26.0 in the Syborg too then.
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1/16/2016
Question from SVH
 
Has anyone had the leather upper rip. Mine ripped when the zipper froze and i pulled the liner out of the boot which resulted in a large tear and de-lam. Kind of a bummer as it's now a matter of time before the upper is useless, tried to glue it but it just takes too much pressure when the liner comes out.
1/16/2016
Answer from jbo
 
Hi SVH, you should not force the liner out without unzipping the cover (which is not leather). We tell customers to zip up without the velcro attached to avoid unnecessary strain on the cover. Sportiva warranty covers problems not due to abuse.
1/17/2016
Answer from Sean V
 
thanks for the response jbo,
the zipper was frozen solid so i couldn't unzip it, not necessarily looking for a warranty though. do you have any advice on how to repair so that the entire upper doesn't rip off? gorilla glue and duct tape failed pretty quickly.
1/17/2016
Answer from jbo
 
Sorry Sean, haven't had to try yet. I've been babying mine.
4/8/2016
Answer from Andrew D
 
yes, i've had little rips on mine but likely because when removing my foot from the boot (liner still on), i forget to pull off the velcro first. it was a learning curve after years of pulling my foot out while leaving the liner in...
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1/13/2016
Question from Chris
 
What is the last width? What is the widest of all skimo race boots?
1/13/2016
Answer from jbo
 
Hi Chris, Sportiva lists it as 100.4 in the size 27. The widest race boot is currently the DNA.
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10/24/2015
Question from Derek
 
I live in Alaska, and will be in Utah Dec 3-16. Can I swing by your warehouse and try a pair of these on? Easier than ordering the wrong sized and dealing with the epic shipping fest to Ketchikan.
10/24/2015
Answer from jbo
 
Hah, sure Derek! We now have a brick and mortar location in Cottonwood Heights, near the base of Big Cottonwood Canyon.
10/24/2015
Answer from Derek W
 
Good to know. Thanks. I guess I'll have to make the annual trip to Utah to get skis tuned, buy gear, etc;)
10/24/2015
Answer from jbo
 
I'm still trying to figure out why you moved away!
10/24/2015
Answer from Derek W
 
I guess this isn't the place for the reason, but think........endless new outdoor opportunity (skiing, hiking, fishing, rafting, packrafting) with nobody around, true wilderness that doesn't exist in the lower 48, anywhere. You're it. You, the bears, the fish, and the mountains. Silence...........
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10/22/2015
Question from Ben
 
Hello,
Was wondering if anyone could compare sizing between the Syborg and Scarpa's F1 Evo. I'm begrudgingly returning my warrantied pair and am looking for something to fill a similar niche. Thanks!
Ben
10/22/2015
Answer from jbo
 
Hi Ben, I'd say the Syborgs are touch shorter, especially in the half sizes. I went from 27.5 Evo to 28 Syborg. Forefoot last seems similar. These are easier to get into if you didn't cut the rubber on the Evos :)
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10/18/2015
Comment from Carl
 
I can think of one thing La Sportiva forgot...a size 31 boot!
10/18/2015
Reply from jbo
 
Hah, you have a point there! I would suggest shortening your foot, it's worth it.
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5/6/2015
by Randolph R (downright abused product)
 
I bought these boots with the intention to use them as a daily driver and for some longer technical ski traverses. I chose them to fill in the gaps I saw where my Alien 1.0 are a bit week. I wanted something that, like the Alien 1.0, was 1) light weight, 2) full range of motion, and 3) stiff but that also 4) was full coverage, and 5) had a locking mechanism that was less prone to breakage / could easily be repaired in the field. No doubt that the Syborg is light, stiff, and has a full range of motion (and at a great price!) - criteria 1-3 check! On full coverage: I have found that the vinyl outer on the front and the additional insert for the back to be sufficient. The front has proved surprisingly durable and has provided no problems. The back inserts however are flimsy and poorly attached to the boot. Once these back inserts see a bit of wear they easily bent out of shape and sometimes come out of place. when putting the boot liner in the shell. As long as I am concious of the issue it's fine. So criteria 4 is met... but not with flying colors. Criteria 5 is where things get tricky. On first inspection and use the locking mechanism is smooth as can be, but there are some issues. First, the locking lever gets in the way of most automatic crampons. You can adjust the tension on the locking lever to make space for a normal automatic crampon heel lock - but this is completely impractical in the field. I have gotten around this by using a pair of CAMP race 290's which utilize a TLT specific design or by using a pair of crampons with Petzl's sidelock mechanism - neither of which get in the way of the boot's locking mechanism. This is something potential buyers must be aware of - without the right crampons this boot can become significantly less useful (at least in my mind). This is especially relevant as I consider one of the boots greatest strengths is how well it climbs. I have lead WI4 in these boots without any problems (much better climbing boot than the Alien 1.0). Howerver the real issue with the locking mechanism that it can potentially be pushed upwards, triggering a safety release, when walking in deep snow (especially walking downhill). Resetting the spring back into place is a major pain in the ass (even if you're sitting at home in your living room). I've only had this issue on two occasions but it was enough to bend the spring that tensions the locking mechanism so that even once the spring was reset there was not enough tension for the boot to lock into ski mode. Luckily I was sitting by a car and could take the time to sit down and get at the spring with a leatherman and bend it back into shape to provide just enough tension to lock the boots into ski mode. I would expect a more durable and robust build for such a crucial part on the boot - which in the end has proved quite flimsy. The Syborgs are a great everyday touring ski that super comfy (great liner that dries super quick) and ski great. I detract one star from my rating because of the specific technical details with the locking mechanism and the flimsy nature of the rear snow guard inserts. Overall I am quite satisfied with these boots.That being said, I prefer the alien 1.0 without question when it comes to racing and training. I often tell people that I think of the alien 1.0 as a running shoe, the syborg as an approach shoe, and the the tlt6 as a light boot.
5/6/2015
Reply from jbo
 
Hi Randolph, thanks for the detailed feedback. FYI there is a fix for the lever spring issue. Sportiva is sending out new lock levers that have a pin to prevent the upwards movement that releases the spring. I can send you a set when they arrive.
5/6/2015
Reply from Randolph R
 
EPIC!

You are really are the best internet retailer I've ever dealt with (by a mile - even 10 miles!)!
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3/9/2015
by bmac (used product a few times)
 
I have only used these twice so far, but am very impressed with the range of motion, weight (29's were 859g), snug but comfortable fit, and stiffness. My feet are 285mm long, 109mm wide at the forefoot and heel is about 68mm. I have a lot of trouble getting my heel snug in hiking boots, running shoes, and nordic boots, but these are pretty good right out of the box. I'll probably add some inserts to snug the heel up a up a bit, but I'm not even sure if it's necessary. If you have a wider forefoot than me, you'll likely have to do some modifications to the shell. Doing the shell fit I'm just about touching either side of the boot without the liner in. I have a fairly low volume foot and usually need to run two insoles in my ski boots to fill up the vertical space, but these fit really well.

I was mostly impressed with how stiff and responsive these were on the icecoast moguls we skiied last weekend at the Jay Peak rando race. I felt that they skiied as well, if not better, than my black diamond primes on the hardpack, and WAY better than the only other touring boot I've used - the scarpa flash.

The walk to ski mode switch is super easy. No straining to close the buckle at all. Pretty amazing compared to the beefier alpine and touring boots I've used where I need serious leverage to get a snug ankle fit.

I'm somewhat skeptical about the durability of these, given the plastic buckle, and plastic latches for the string that secures your ankle, but only time will tell on that. The skepticism may prove unwarranted - fingers crossed. I think the forefoot boa closure scarpa is using is probably the best design - I love the boas on my cycling shoes - but this ankle strap works well to secure the foot in place.

I'll add details as I ski them more!
2/2/2016
Reply from bmac
 
Wanted to update this since I promised I'd do so above after some use. I've now used them in a variety of race and touring situations, and remounted my heavier skis so I could use them all the time. I have at least 160k of vert on them now, as well as some ice climbing, and plenty of rock/off-snow travel. I don't have the red snow guards or power straps on, and haven't felt the need. The soles are holding up well, and the plastic shells are less banged up than I would have thought for so much off snow abuse. The ankle articulation is incredible - virtually zero resistance. The rear latch mechanism was susceptible to having the spring pop out. It happened once while post holing, and another time while bootpacking I hit the lever with the toe of my other boot. The spring popped out in both cases. Over the summer I was devising ways to come up with a way to block it, but fortunately La Sportiva did it already - literally the exact I idea I had! It should prevent this from happening, and up to this point that was the only notable drawback. Jason shipped me a pair for free and I just switched them out. Hopefully that takes care of the issue.

One minor downside to the ski/walk mechanism is that the rear latch can interfere with some automatic crampons. The smaller the crampon lever (like the light camp ones) the better.

Mine fit well out of the box with some liner molding, but I've heard from folks that boot fitters have been able to easily modify/widen these boots. From what I understand that's a concern with many lightweight boots, but apparently these have been easy to work with.
4/4/2016
Reply from Pdw w
 
bmac, just received a pair for my wife and for the first time in my life I read the manual....

It seems to solve your crampon issue if you want to go with steel ones:


2. ADJUSTING THE LOCKING SYSTEM
In the case of use of crampons, you will need to adjust the rear boot lock[E] so that it does not interfere with the crampon during walking. Then regulate the adjustment screw on the locking lever[F], thus varying the inclination of the locking system.
5/19/2017
Reply from bmac
 
Update after two seasons of use. I think these were a pretty solid intro boot for me. I used them for racing and daily touring with the hagan race and cirrus skis from mid 2015 through mid 2017 seasons. After 3 seasons they're pretty beat up but still functioning. Soles have held up well even with lots of non-snow travel. At this point there's lots of play in the cuff rivots. I haven't attempted to swap them out with replaceable rivets the way folks have with pdg/tlts/evos. Not sure if it's possible. Based on the wear and tear compared to friends' alien 1.0's and pdg/evos - the only thing that makes these less durable are the cuff rivets. I think the liners are warmer and the gaiters keep more snow out than other brands comparable models. In the past few months I also picked up the Fischer Traverse and a pair of Pierre Gignoux's. Obviously the PG's are better at skinning and skiing by a wide margin, and the Fischers are immensely better at skiing with a slight compromise for skinning. Next season I'll probably still use the syborgs for fast training, PGs for racing, and the Fischers for the remaining 90%. If you're just getting into racing, or looking for one boot - this is a good choice if it fits. If you're a few seasons in and getting serious, I'd go with a real race boot and a light touring boot like the Fischers.
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2/19/2015
by Kevin (used product regularly)
 
Fantastic boot! Considering it's in the same price range as the non carbon alien, it beats it hands down! There's no comparison.
Lighter, skis better, and less bulky.

The 75 degrees movement range is amazing... It's like wearing a Pierre Gignoux.

If you have the choice between the Cyborgs, Aliens or PDG's, go for these!!!
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2/10/2015
Question from Ryan (hasn't used product)
 
Any experience with these as a general powder touring boot for non race skis? I'm intrigued by the statement above that they are a bit stiffer then the non carbon alien but I can't find much info out there on how these ski big skis. Are they in the same ball park as something like my original orange maestrales?
2/11/2015
Answer from jbo
 
Hi Ryan, race boots can't compare to the 4 bucklers in terms of support, but you don't really need a crutch to ski powder. There would be some limit to your aggressiveness, but the limit would be found sooner with big skis in hard conditions.
2/21/2015
Answer from Kevin T
 
I bought the Syborg boot primarily for racing (newbie racing that is) and long light tours, but I have also taken them out for a day in the deep powder with my wide boards, which are La Sportiva Hi5's. the Hi5 is 105 underfoot and reasonably stiff (and heavy by today's standards). My conclusion is that the boot's ability to drive a big ski is very conditions-dependent. The day I took them out, the conditions were sublime: I did 4500 ft of perfect 12-18" of powder and skied them fast on mostly mellow terrain (low 30's). The boot handled the ski amazingly well - I had no gripes whatsoever. I could turn the ski fast through the trees and also completely let it rip in the open terrain.

That said, those were pretty much the easiest conditions ever. I've also had the boot out in less than ideal (and sometimes very hateful) conditions, and even on light, skinny skis, I've wished for more support and less flex. As soon as the conditions get variable in the slightest, I notice an immediate decline in control relative to other touring boots I've skied in the past (like my TLT5P's).

So, if you tried to ski this boot hard on a wide, heavy plank like a Hi5 in steep, variable, or perhaps less than ideal conditions, I think it will leave something to be desired. In contrast, my TLT5P handles this ski in all of those conditions sufficiently well (with the tongue insert in). Caveat: I haven't yet tried the Syborg's power strap, so maybe that would improve things.

Finally, I'll say that I really love the Syborg, and I think it does exactly what it's designed to do. It's my first race boot, so I can't compare it against other race boots, but it is extremely comfortable for my foot, has excellent articulation and is stiff enough to get the job done. It has completely replaced my TLT5P for long, light touring, and I'll even continue to use it with my big skis when the conditions are just right.
3/1/2015
Answer from JDT
 
I have been using these boots since the end of December 2014. This is a quick follow-up to my review below and answering the above questions. First of all since my first review I have been skiing with the Red rubberized-plastic heel insert. This is very flexible. It does NOT inhibit the walking mode at all. It is effective in keeping the snow out, and it makes getting into the shell easier. It is best to put the liner on first and then slide into the shell.

Second, regarding the stiffness. I have been using the power strap and it is very effective to improve stiffness. In fact it is nearly perfect. In comparison I found the power strap on the non-carbon aliens to have essentially no effect on performance. On the TLT5P the powerstrap is very effective to boost performance, but I have to loosen it for walking/touring. (This is not a big deal when casually touring in a non-race environment). By contrast, I have been touring and racing with the power strap on the Syborgs. Even with the strap tight, the walking performance is not adversely affected compared to walking with it loosened. As well, the strap definitely helps with performance. Adjust at the beginning of your tour or race and forget it.

I have been touring and racing on these. Touring with both Hagan Cirrus and x-races. I have no complaints regarding stiffness or performance with these. I have been skiing powder, crust, 50 degree bomb-proof chutes. I find the difference between these and the TLT5P (used without the tongue) is not as much stiffness, but rather a rougher ride due to more defection due to the lightness of the equipment (This is accentuated by the fact that I am using these boots primarily with narrower, light-weight skis) Adding the Tongue certainly makes the TLT5P closer to a four buckle boot IMO, but I am also lighter than most...
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