10/7/2017
 
Definitely not your typical backcountry skiing guide book, as the author is not your typical guide book author: David Goodman is a 'real" writer who mainly writes on "real" topics (often with his sister Amy Goodman, whom you might have listened to on NPR affiliates while driving to and from your ski outings). This guide book also has some impressive historical pedigree, as the first edition was published in 1989, back when backcountry skiing was a very obscure activity in the Northeast. And still, wheneve...
10/6/2017
 
I've been bringing this along as a back-up and supplemental light for many many years -- hard to believe a product still this innovative has already been along for so long. Shorn of its carrying case and strap, and instead clipped directly to a pack strap, this headlamp weighs almost nothing, and is so small as to be entirely unobtrusive. Yet the light is quite useful at short distances, and offers a versatile range of modes. Makes a great gift too for your ski partner who might otherwise have everything...
10/6/2017
 
If all your ski mountaineering takes place entirely on snow, then you don't need a diamond stone. However, if your skiing surfaces include occasional interludes of rocks and other non-snow surfaces, this diamond stone is an absolute must for your tuning kit. Or even if you don't have a tuning kit, this diamond stone will still be hugely helpful all by itself in removing overhanging burrs caused by close encounters of the rock kind. If you do have a tuning kit, or at least have the ability to sharpen your ed...
10/6/2017
 
In the Northeast, we have no need to detune tips and tails, since a few descents on our typical "snow" during in-bounds resort skimo training will take of that. However, we aren't immune from the laws of metallurgy, or whatever science dictates how steel edges will rust if melting snow isn't immediately removed on the drive home. A gummy stone -- or gumi if you want to be more Euro about it -- is perfect for removing rust. It's essentially a super-abrasive version of a rubber eraser. So just enough abrasi...
10/6/2017
 
This is a highly unusual design -- in a good way -- for an "economy" waxing iron. Until this model came along relatively recently, all price-point waxing irons were distinguished from their pricier brethren by a very thin base plate. This meant the iron didn't hold heat very well, so once you started ironing your skis, the wax wouldn't melt very well, yet as soon as you took the iron off your skis, the iron would start smoking up your room. This model though has a base plate of the same thickness as models...